Hypertext: An Overview

George P. Landow, Professor of English and Art History, Brown University

[Not in print version.This lexia functions as an overview for all of Hypertext, but since only the first chapter and some recent additions appear here in the WWW version, the following headings have only a small percentage of the links found in Hypertext in Hypertext. Web users might wish to look at the much more complete overview for the hypertext literature and theory sections of the Cyberspace, Hypertext, and Critical Theory site.]

Definitions

A General Definition
Modes of Hypertext (to be added inHypertext 2.0)
Hypermedia

Components

Node, lexia
Barthes's term
Link
link
blurs edges of text
creates multisequentiality
shifts textual boundaries
Path
trails or sets of links
reader chooses
in Memex
Web
Network
four definitions
web as network
document sets
sets of electronically linked computers
docuverse, metatext
critical theory paradigm
in physical sciences

Textuality

assemblage
decentered
open
blurred boundaries
Derrida and textual openness
fluidity, changeability
multivocal
intertextuality
nonlinearity, a-linearity, and multilinearity
writerly versus readerly

Authorship

authorship
authorial property
collaboration
notions of self
changed role of reader

Virtuality

fundamental
not binary opposition

Compared to other Information Technologies

orality
manuscript culture
print
reading Hypertext compared to reading an work with notes
Barthes's notions of print textuality
Joyce's Gerty
Derrida's end of the book
microfilm
cinema
electronic

Cultural Context: Postmodernism

Baudrillard
Pompidou Center Project for decentered Paris

Literature

Literary & Critical Theory

an Overview
Parallels between Hypertext and Literary Theory
Hypertext embodies

Philosophy & Religion

Biblical Typology
Hypertext Bibles
Rorty

Technology & Physical Sciences

Cultural History

Education: Teaching and Learning

students
teachers
institutions
resources

Political Context and Implications


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